NOW THEN – Issue 64

NowThen

THE JANSKYS.

WHEN SILENCE SPEAKS.
SAWAYAKA SHEFFIELD.

REVIEWER – TASHA FRANEK.

It makes a pleasant change to come across an under-the-radar band that hasn’t just stepped onto the scene. With age and experience on their side, The Janskys prove that you don’t have to be under 25 to commit to an exciting musical adventure. Originally formed in 2007 from the loins of various other bands and solo projects, the group had a bit of a re-shuffle and took some time out after their debut record. After spending the last couple of years producing and perfecting album number two, The Janskys are back with When Silence Speaks.

It’s evident that the band draw influences from a collection of different decades and genres. From flashes of 60s psychedelia teamed with indie riffs to fun folky melodies with catchy rhythms, the album covers everything you could ask for in the eclectic world of rock and pop.

Opening track ‘After the Flood’ offers a soft and sweet introduction to the album, showcasing Damian Sackett’s gentle vocals. There is a dreamy, ballad-like feel to this otherwise upbeat track, which proves to be an underlying theme throughout the album and an element which makes the record very easy to listen to in any situation. ‘Tell Me’ kicks in with a little more bite than its immediate predecessor, and while the wistful ambience continues, the guitar feels heavier. Inspiration from bands like Led Zeppelin, who on first impression seem worlds away from the sound that The Janskys are creating, suddenly start to become apparent.

The stunning two-minute instrumental ‘Interlude’ is a real treat and completely encapsulates the euphoria of the album. It also seems to separate the quite straightforward pop tracks of the first half from the more ground-breaking selection of songs that are yet to come. The sweeping guitar hook in ‘Brocco Bank’ brings an enchanting sombre atmosphere, perfectly complimented by vocals which melt effortlessly into each other as all good harmonies should. ‘I Fall Down’ and final track ‘Devil In Your Head’ are also winners in my mind, both toying with the folk side of the band’s style, particularly the latter, in which vocalist Pat Donoghue demonstrates exactly how reverb should be used.

A fine example of how slow and steady can win the race, I’m really glad that The Janskys took their time on this album because it has been fine tuned to production perfection. As with most bands I discover through an album, I’d like to hear the tracks live to experience the full extent of the passion behind the sound. For anybody who feels the same, pop along to Shakespeare’s on 12th July for the album launch.

ORIGINAL ARTICLE CAN BE FOUND IN THE ONLINE ISSUE 64 OF NOW THEN HERE:  http://nowthenmagazine.com/sheffield/issue-64/albums/

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